Wendy M. Featherstone PT, DPT

Jennifer Morin PT, MSPT, OCS

   
     
 

Pelvic Pain is often a result of imbalances of the muscles surrounding the pelvis, including the pelvic floor muscles. Common pelvic pain syndromes include: Vulvar Vestibulitis, Vulvodynia, Interstitial Cystitis, Vaginismus,Painful Intercourse, Pelvic Organ Prolapse, Dysmenorrhea, Constipation and Urinary Retention

 

Physical therapy treatment is focused on correcting postural faults, coordinating abdominal, respiratory diaphragm, and pelvic floor muscle activity, and normalizing tone in the pelvic musculature.

 

     
 

Incontinence or the leakage of urine or feces may be caused by weakness in the pelvic floor muscles, and poor muscle balance in the abdominal and hip muscles. Common types of incontinence are: Stress Incontinence, Urge Incontinence, Mixed Incontinence, and Fecal Incontinence.

 

Exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles (commonly known as “Kegels”) are helpful in regaining control of the bladder and bowel. A physical therapy program can help identify the correct muscles, and assist in the strengthening process. The abdominal muscles and hip muscles are assessed as they also play a role in continence. Techniques to reduce pressure on the bladder, and the impact of diet on incontinence are also addressed.

 

     
 

Osteoporosis is a potentially life-threatening condition related to poor bone density. This reduction in bone density makes the bone more susceptible to breakage.

 

A physical therapy program of postural strengthening and balance exercises for fall prevention can reduce risk of fracture associated with osteoporosis.

 

     
 

Obstetric Pain or pain during the prenatal and postpartum period, is very common due to hormonal effects on supportive structures, swelling, and and a shift in a woman’s center of gravity.

 

Physical therapy treatment helps restore proper alignment, strengthen the postural support of that alignment, and modify everyday activities to decrease strain on the spine and extremities.

 

   
     
 

Pelvic Pain, Constipation & Urinary Retention are often a result of imbalances of the muscles surrounding the pelvis, including the pelvic floor muscles. In men, pelvic pain is sometimes referred to as Chronic Prostatitis, and is generally related to tension or spasm in the pelvic muscles. Pudendal Neuralgia is a pelvic pain syndrome associated with nerve compression or irritation. Pelvic floor muscle tension or poor coordination can contribute to symptoms of Constipation and
Urinary Retention.

 

Physical therapy treatment is focused on correcting postural faults, coordinating abdominal, respiratory diaphragm, and pelvic floor muscle activity, and normalizing tone in the pelvic musculature. Treatment may consist of manual release of the muscles, stretching and strengthening exercises, and use of biofeedback to assist in identifying correct muscle action.

 

     
 

Urinary Incontinence or the leakage of urine is most common in men following prostate surgery. The prostate provides support for the bladder and urethra After Prostatectomy some of this support is lost, resulting in loss of urine, particularly during forceful activities such as coughing, sneezing, lifting, or changing position.

 

Exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles (commonly known as “Kegels”) are helpful in regaining control of the bladder and bowel. A physical therapy program can help identify the correct muscles, and assist in the strengthening process. The abdominal muscles and hip muscles are assessed as they also play a role in continence. Techniques to reduce pressure on the bladder, and the impact of diet on incontinence are also addressed.

 

     
 

Fecal Incontinence or the leakage of stool may be a result of weakness in the anal sphincter.

 

Exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles (commonly known as “Kegels”) are helpful in regaining control of the bladder and bowel. A physical therapy program can help identify the correct muscles, and assist in the strengthening process. The abdominal muscles and hip muscles are assessed as they also play a role in continence. Techniques to reduce pressure on the bladder, and the impact of diet on incontinence are also addressed.

 

   
     
 

Constipation is marked by less than 3 bowel movements per week, incomplete emptying or blockage of stool, hard or lumpy stool, and the need to strain. Constripation may lead to bed wetting, staining of the underwear, or incontinence.

 

Physical therapy treatment is focused on proper toileting behaviors and positioning, dietary considerations, massage techniques, and re-training of the pevlic floor musculature.

 

     
 

Incontinence or the leakage of urine or feces may be caused by weakness in the pelvic floor muscles and poor muscle balance in the abdominal and hip musculature. In children, constipation may also play a role. Common types of incontinence include: enuresis (bed wetting), giggle incontinence (leakage associated with laughing), stress incontinence (leakage due to playground activities), fecal incontinence (loss of bowel control due to muscle weakness), and encoporesis (fecal incontinence in a child who has already learned voluntary control of his bowels).

 

Correction of constipation is the first step in treating incontinence. Exercises to strengthening the pelvic floor muscles are helpful in regaining control of the bladder and bowel as well. A physical therapy program can help identify the correct muscles and assist in the strengthening process.

 

     
 

Pelvic Pain is often a result of an imbalance of muscle strength surrounding the pelvis, including the pelvic floor muscles. Common pelvic pain syndromes include: painful urination, urinary retention, and coccydynia.

 

Physical treatment is focused on correcting postural faults, coordinating abdominal, respiratory diaphragm, and pelvice floor muscle activity, and normalizing pelvic floor muscle tone.

 

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