Wendy M. Featherstone PT, DPT

Jennifer Morin PT, MSPT, OCS

   
 
  • What do I need to bring?
    • Referral (if you have one)
    • Insurance card and/or claim number (coverage information)
    • Photo ID
    • Appropriate copayment (check or cash)
    • Completed paperwork (sent via mail)
  • What happens during my first visit?
    • Arrive at your scheduled appointment time with your intake paperwork (we will send it to you in the mail when you schedule your appointment)
    • We will collect any referral, insurance, prescriptions, or medical history information you may have
    • We will make a photocopy of your insurance card and photo ID for our files
    • The initial evaluation lasts 45 minutes, and subsequent appointments will be 30-40 minute sessions
    • During your first appointment, the therapist will discuss:
      • Medical history
      • Current problems, complaints, symptoms
      • Strategies for relief
      • Cause of pain
      • Treatment plans/goals of therapy (including length of care, timeline, home programs, short/long term goals)
    • The physical part of the exam may entail:
      • Palpation
      • Range of Motion testing
      • Strength testing
      • Assessment of posture
      • Internal exam (when necessary)
  • What should I wear?
    • Loose fitting clothing to allow for examination
  • How long are the appointments?
    • The initial evaluation is 45 minutes.  Any following treatments typically are 30-40 minutes long
  • How many times can I expect to come?
    • Each patient establishes a different treatment, working together with their therapist and doctor.  Therefore, the care period varies person to person.  Generally people come on a weekly basis initially and frequency of visits is reduced as your home program develops.  Total number of visits depend upon the diagnosis, the severity of the condition, and your medical history. 
  • What is Physical Therapy?
    • You have probably heard of the profession of physical therapy. Maybe you have had a conversation with a friend about how physical therapy helped get rid of his or her back pain, or you might know someone who needed physical therapy after an injury. You might even have been treated by a physical therapist yourself. But have you ever wondered about physical therapists--who they are and what they do? Many people are familiar with physical therapists' work helping patients with orthopedic problems, such as low back pain or knee surgeries, to reduce pain and regain function. Others may be aware of the treatment that physical therapists provide to assist patients recovering from a stroke (e.g., assisting them with recovering use of their limbs and walking again).
    • The ability to maintain an upright posture and to move your arms and legs to perform all sorts of tasks and activities is an important component of your health. Most of us can learn to live with the various medical conditions that we may develop, but only if we are able to continue at our jobs, take care of our families, and enjoy important occasions with family and friends. All of these activities require the ability to move without difficulty or pain.
    • Because physical therapists are experts in movement and function, they do not confine their talents to treating people who are ill. A large part of a physical therapist's program is directed at preventing injury, loss of movement, and even surgery. Physical therapists work as consultants in industrial settings to improve the design of the workplace and reduce the risk of workers overusing certain muscles or developing low back pain. They also provide services to athletes at all levels to screen for potential problems and institute preventive exercise programs. With the boom in the golf and fitness industries, a number of physical therapists are engaged in consulting with recreational golfers and fitness clubs to develop workouts that are safe and effective, especially for people who already know that they have a problem with their joints or their backs.
    • The cornerstones of physical therapy treatment are therapeutic exercise and functional training. In addition to "hands-on" care, physical therapists also educate patients to take care of themselves and to perform certain exercises on their own. Depending on the particular needs of a patient, physical therapists may also "mobilize" a joint (that is, perform certain types of movements at the end of your range of motion) or massage a muscle to promote proper movement and function. Physical therapists also use methods such as ultrasound (which uses high frequency waves to produce heat), hot packs, and ice. Although other kinds of practitioners will offer some of these treatments as "physical therapy," it's important for you to know that physical therapy can only be provided by qualified physical therapists or by physical therapist assistants, who must complete a 2-year education program and who work only under the direction and supervision of physical therapists.
    • Most forms of physical therapy treatment are covered by your insurance, but the coverage will vary with each plan. Most states do not legally require patients to see their physicians before seeing a physical therapist. Most of the time all you have to do is ask your doctor if physical therapy is right for you.
    • Reference: APTA
  • Are Physical Therapists licensed?
    • Physical therapists (PT's) and physical therapist assistants (PTA's) are licensed by the state.
  • What if I need to cancel?
    • In the event that you need to cancel your appointment, we ask that you kindly notify us 24 hours in advance.  Any appointments cancelled with less than 24 hours notice are subject to a $55.00 fee. 
 
© 2013 Specialty Physical Therapy All Rights Reserved